February 2, 2018

Colloquium Speaker: LT Chester H. Hewitt III


LT Hewitt was born and raised in Dallas, TX. He graduated with merit from the United States Naval Academy in 2009 with a Bachelor of Science in Systems Engineering. At the Academy LT Hewitt lettered with the Varsity Offshore Sailing Team and completed two Newport to Bermuda races, one Around Long Island Race, and numerous local regattas.

After commissioning, LT Hewitt served for two consecutive tours onboard the USS SAMPSON (DDG-102). From 2009-2011 LT Hewitt served as OI Division Officer, Strike Officer, and Force Protection Officer. After completing the Combat Systems Officer Track 4 course at the Aegis Training and Readiness Center, Dahlgren, VA, LT Hewitt returned to SAMPSON to serve as Fire Control Officer and VBSS Officer from 2011-2013. LT Hewitt qualified as Surface Warfare Officer, Tomahawk Engagement Control Officer, Anti-Air Warfare Coordinator, and Tactical Action Officer.




Colloquium Topic: Analysis of Broadband Metamaterial Shielding for Counter-Directed Energy Weapons

Since the dawn of warfare, arms and armor have been locked in a never ending struggle for dominance. A new development in that struggle is the advent of high-power microwave (HPM) directed-energy weapons (DEWs), which can disrupt electronics remotely without the need to inflict kinetic damage. Given the importance of electronics in modern warfare, the ability to rapidly develop a counter to such weapons will be essential to sustaining military operations. This colloquium will investigate the use of microwave-absorbent metamaterials for protection against DEWs and propose a method for the rapid analysis and design of metamaterial structures. The proposed method uses a parameter retrieval algorithm to characterize a complex metamaterial as a simple, homogenized structure. The retrieved parameters can then be applied to a smooth, homogenized layer in a finite element model, which closely approximates the performance of the original metamaterial analyzed. The homogenized layer model requires far less time and effort to simulate than a complex metamaterial unit cell. The retrieved parameters are applicable to simulated scale models as well, thus reducing the need for physical, scale-model prototypes and accelerating the design process to keep pace with rapidly emerging threats.