BEGIN:VCALENDAR PRODID:-//Microsoft Corporation//Outlook 16.0 MIMEDIR//EN VERSION:2.0 METHOD:PUBLISH X-MS-OLK-FORCEINSPECTOROPEN:TRUE BEGIN:VTIMEZONE TZID:Eastern Standard Time BEGIN:STANDARD DTSTART:16011104T020000 RRULE:FREQ=YEARLY;BYDAY=1SU;BYMONTH=11 TZOFFSETFROM:-0400 TZOFFSETTO:-0500 END:STANDARD BEGIN:DAYLIGHT DTSTART:16010311T020000 RRULE:FREQ=YEARLY;BYDAY=2SU;BYMONTH=3 TZOFFSETFROM:-0500 TZOFFSETTO:-0400 END:DAYLIGHT END:VTIMEZONE BEGIN:VEVENT CLASS:PUBLIC CREATED:20220415T131705Z DESCRIPTION:JHU/APL Colloquium - www.jhuapl.edu/colloquium \n \nTOPIC: Is the public exposed to airborne ultrasou nd\, and are there adverse effects?\n \nSPEAKER: Timothy Leighton\, South ampton Univ.\n \nAnecdotal reports of adverse human effects of industrial ultrasound in air date back to the 1940s. Whilst high levels could produce quantifiable temporary or permanent hearing loss\, humans usually encount ered lower levels and some reported less quantifiable symptoms: headache\, nausea\, tinnitus\, migraine\, an unpleasant feeling of ‘pressure in th e ear’. Poor science\, and contamination of the sound field by high leve ls of audio-frequency noise\, meant that the slight amounts of credible da ta (dating from the 1960s) were swamped by the incredible\, providing a po or basis for safety guidelines. The best guidelines were produced in 1984\ , 18 years after the 1960s reports\, and these were entitled ‘interim gu idelines’ in the expectation that new data would be taken to fill the da ta gaps that were so evident\, and so provide more authoritative guideline s.\n \nIn the 37 years from then to today\, those data gaps have not been filled. About 8 years ago\, members of the public approached the author co mplaining of adverse effects in public spaces (museums\, shops\, railway s tations etc.) and on inspection\, these were shown to contain airborne ult rasound that was exposing the public without their knowledge. Guidelines f or public exposures need to take into account the fact that\, unlike indus trial exposure\, the age range\, medical history\, susceptibility\, pre-ex isting conditions\, and duration of exposure cannot be known or logged\, a nd there is no possibility of monitoring for adverse during exposure\, or offering hearing protection. The plethora of devices emitting ultrasound i n air had arisen from the fall in price of powerful emitters and digital s ignal processing and control\, and their deployment resulted from the mist aken belief that the lower frequency limit for ultrasound is 20 kHz\, and that humans cannot hear above this (both of which are untrue). The devices range from the expected (e.g. rodent and bird deterrents\, automatic door opening systems)\, to the unexpected (e.g. covert surveillance of an indi vidual’s viewing habits at home). Some cannot work without exposing huma ns to high levels of ultrasound (e.g. acoustic spotlights\, deterrents to keep teenagers from luxury stores\, haptic feedback systems).\n \nInterest in the topic increased with the unvalidated attribution\, from 2017\, of ultrasound in reports of attacks on the USA Embassy in Cuba.\n \nThis pres entation will outline how the convolution of myth and data led to a state where public exposures are being undertaken without warning\, how the real phenomenon might be distinguished from misinformation\, to what extent th e protecting guidelines are inadequate\, and the experimental challenges i n filling the data gaps to correct this situation.\n\nTimothy Leighton FRS FREng FMedSci ScD is the founder and Chair of the Global Network for Anti Microbial Resistance and Infection Prevention (Global-NAMRIP). He is Profe ssor of Ultrasonics and Underwater Acoustics at the University of Southamp ton\; and the Executive General Director and Inventor-in-Chief of Sloan Wa ter Technology Ltd.\, a UK manufacturer and R&D establishment founded on h is patents. A fellow of three National Academies\, he has been awarded 8 i nternational medals\, and 6 international prizes. His fundamental discover ies have led to changes in practice\, and the introduction of new technolo gy\, for ocean and space exploration\; for climate change prediction\; for infection prevention and pandemic research\; for the safety of human expo sure to ultrasound\; for marine mammal communications and behaviour\; for the treatment of osteoporosis\, kidney disease and migraine\; and for adva nced radar and sonar. The Institute of Physics Paterson medal citation (20 06) describes “Timothy Leighton’s contribution is outstanding in both breadth and depth. He is an acknowledged world leader in four fields”.\n \n DTEND;TZID="Eastern Standard Time":20220624T150000 DTSTAMP:20220415T131705Z DTSTART;TZID="Eastern Standard Time":20220624T140000 LAST-MODIFIED:20220415T131705Z LOCATION:Zoom.Gov online webinar PRIORITY:5 SEQUENCE:0 SUMMARY;LANGUAGE=en-us:Colloquium - Timothy Leighton - Southampton Univ TRANSP:OPAQUE UID:040000008200E00074C5B7101A82E00800000000B00B4CAF9042D801000000000000000 010000000FF49D0D0FB1E3F44BFD58A67213B1B10 X-ALT-DESC;FMTTYPE=text/html:

JHU/AP L Colloquium - www.jhuapl.edu/colloquium

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TOPIC:  Is the public exposed to airborne ul trasound\, and are there adverse effects?

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SPEAKER:  Timothy Leighton\, Southampton Univ.

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Anecdotal reports of adverse human ef fects of industrial ultrasound in air date back to the 1940s. Whilst high levels could produce quantifiable temporary or permanent hearing loss\, hu mans usually encountered lower levels and some reported less quantifiable symptoms: headache\, nausea\, tinnitus\, migraine\, an unpleasant feeling of ‘\;pressure in the ear’\;. Poor science\, and contamination o f the sound field by high levels of audio-frequency noise\, meant that the slight amounts of credible data (dating from the 1960s) were swamped by t he incredible\, providing a poor basis for safety guidelines. The best gui delines were produced in 1984\, 18 years after the 1960s reports\, and the se were entitled ‘\;interim guidelines’\; in the expectation tha t new data would be taken to fill the data gaps that were so evident\, and so provide more authoritative guidelines.

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In the 37 years from then to today\, those data gaps have not been filled . About 8 years ago\, members of the public approached the author complain ing of adverse effects in public spaces (museums\, shops\, railway station s etc.) and on inspection\, these were shown to contain airborne ultrasoun d that was exposing the public without their knowledge. Guidelines for pub lic exposures need to take into account the fact that\, unlike industrial exposure\, the age range\, medical history\, susceptibility\, pre-existing conditions\, and duration of exposure cannot be known or logged\, and the re is no possibility of monitoring for adverse during exposure\, or offeri ng hearing protection. The plethora of devices emitting ultrasound in air had arisen from the fall in price of powerful emitters and digital signal processing and control\, and their deployment resulted from the mistaken b elief that the lower frequency limit for ultrasound is 20 kHz\, and that h umans cannot hear above this (both of which are untrue). The devices range from the expected (e.g. rodent and bird deterrents\, automatic door openi ng systems)\, to the unexpected (e.g. covert surveillance of an individual ’\;s viewing habits at home). Some cannot work without exposing human s to high levels of ultrasound (e.g. acoustic spotlights\, deterrents to k eep teenagers from luxury stores\, haptic feedback systems).

< o:p> \;

Interest in the topic increased with the unvalidated attribution\, from 2017\, of ultrasound in reports of attacks on the USA Embassy in Cuba.

 \;

Th is presentation will outline how the convolution of myth and data led to a state where public exposures are being undertaken without warning\, how t he real phenomenon might be distinguished from misinformation\, to what ex tent the protecting guidelines are inadequate\, and the experimental chall enges in filling the data gaps to correct this situation.


Timothy Leighton FRS FREng FMedSci ScD is the founder and Chair of the Global Network for AntiMicrobial Resistance and Infection Prevention (Global-NAMRIP). He is Professor of Ultrasonics and Underwater Acoustics at the University of Southa mpton\; and the Executive General Director and Inventor-in-Chief of Sloan Water Technology Ltd.\, a UK manufacturer and R&\;D establishment found ed on his patents. A fellow of three National Academies\, he has been awar ded 8 international medals\, and 6 international prizes. His fundamental d iscoveries have led to changes in practice\, and the introduction of new t echnology\, for ocean and space exploration\; for climate change predictio n\; for infection prevention and pandemic research\; for the safety of hum an exposure to ultrasound\; for marine mammal communications and behaviour \; for the treatment of osteoporosis\, kidney disease and migraine\; and f or advanced radar and sonar. The Institute of Physics Paterson medal citat ion (2006) describes “\;Timothy Leighton’\;s contribution is outstanding in both breadth and depth. He is an acknowledged world leader in four fields”\;.

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