Cognitive swarming in complex environments with attractor dynamics and oscillatory computing

arXiv


Abstract

Neurobiological theories of spatial cognition developed with respect to recording data from relatively small and/or simplistic environments compared to animals' natural habitats. It has been unclear how to extend theoretical models to large or complex spaces. Complementarily, in autonomous systems technology, applications have been growing for distributed control methods that scale to large numbers of low-footprint mobile platforms. Animals and many-robot groups must solve common problems of navigating complex and uncertain environments. Here, we introduce the NeuroSwarms control framework to investigate whether adaptive, autonomous swarm control of minimal artificial agents can be achieved by direct analogy to neural circuits of rodent spatial cognition. NeuroSwarms analogizes agents to neurons and swarming groups to recurrent networks. We implemented neuron-like agent interactions in which mutually visible agents operate as if they were reciprocally-connected place cells in an attractor network. We attributed a phase state to agents to enable patterns of oscillatory synchronization similar to hippocampal models of theta-rhythmic (5-12 Hz) sequence generation. We demonstrate that multi-agent swarming and reward approach dynamics can be expressed as a mobile form of Hebbian learning and that NeuroSwarms supports a single-entity paradigm that directly informs theoretical models of animal cognition. We present emergent behaviors including phase organized rings and trajectory sequences that interact with environmental cues and geometry in large, fragmented mazes. Thus, NeuroSwarms is a model artificial spatial system that integrates autonomous control and theoretical neuroscience to potentially uncover common principles to advance both domains.

Citation

@onlineMonaco_2019 author: Monaco Joseph D. and Hwang Grace M. and Schultz Kevin M. and Zhang Kechen title: Cognitive swarming in complex environments with attractor dynamics and oscillatory computing year: 2019 month: Sep eprinttype: arXiv eprint: 1909.06711v1 howpublished: arXiv:1909.06711v1 url: http://arxiv.org/abs/1909.06711v1

Contact Us


Chief
Ashley Llorens
Ashley.Llorens@jhuapl.edu
240-228-0312

Experience Manager
Tricia Latham
Patricia.Latham@jhuapl.edu
240-228-8048

Physical Address
7701 Montpelier Road
Laurel, MD 20723


The Intelligent Systems Center is located at the Montpelier Campus of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory.
Click here for a map, directions and other visitor information.