HomeMission AreasResearch and Exploratory DevelopmentApplied NeuroscienceTeam 

Applied Neuroscience

Applied Neuroscience Applied Neuroscience Applied Neuroscience

Team

The Applied Neuroscience team comprises scientists and engineers with a broad base of knowledge spanning many disciplines, including:

  • Systems neuroscience
  • Computational neuroscience
  • Cognitive science
  • Social neuroscience
  • Psychology
  • Human performance
  • Brain–computer interfaces
  • Neural prosthetics
  • Neuromorphic hardware
  • Neuro-inspired algorithms

The team works collaboratively within and across APL sectors and with other local and national universities, including The Johns Hopkins University, Georgetown University, the University of Chicago, the University of Pittsburgh, and Caltech, among others. A partial list of team members appears below:

Dr. Mark Chevillet (Program Manager)

Mark Chevillet is the program manager for the Applied Neuroscience Portfolio at APL. Dr. Chevillet leads a talented and experienced team of scientists, engineers, and clinicians in research efforts focused on understanding, predicting, and enhancing the performance of our intelligence analysts and warfighters by developing new applications in the areas of neuromimetic computer algorithms, brain–computer interface technologies, and neural assessments of human task performance. He has extensive background in systems and cognitive neuroscience, with expertise in the use of noninvasive neuroimaging, psychophysics, and computational modeling methods. He received a B.S. in physics with a minor in mathematics from Washington State University as well as a Ph.D. in neuroscience from Georgetown University.

separator
Michael McLoughlin (Chief Engineer)

Mike McLoughlin is the Research and Exploratory Development Department’s chief engineer. He leads world-class teams with a broad range of disciplines to develop, integrate, and transition innovative systems using advanced biomedical technologies in order to meet the needs of the military. In 2009, Mike assumed leadership responsibilities for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s (DARPA’s) Revolutionizing Prosthetics (RP) program at APL and is leading efforts to transition use of RP technologies to human subjects. His technical experience includes development of rapidly emerging technologies and sensor systems, technology transfer, program management, signal processing, applied engineering and technology development, aerosol science research, and microbiological laboratory analysis.

Mike began his career at APL in 1985 and has held progressively responsible line and program management positions during his tenure at the Laboratory. He has had significant roles in the Biomedicine and Homeland Protection Mission Areas; established and managed new programs, and built the technical organizations required to support these fast-growing enterprises. In addition, he teaches both program management and systems engineering at The Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering. He received a B.S. and an M.S. in electrical engineering, both from the University of Delaware.

separator
Dr. Brock Wester (Acting Section Supervisor)

Brock Wester received a B.S. in computer engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology (Atlanta, GA) in 2004 and a joint Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University (Atlanta, GA) in 2010. Currently, Dr. Wester is a Senior Professional Staff member and serves as a project manager in the Applied Neuroscience Section of APL’s Research and Exploratory Development Department. His research areas include microelectromechanical systems microfabrication and packaging, brain–computer and neural interfaces, prosthetics, control systems, traumatic brain injury, blast injury, and virtual environments. Dr. Wester is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology (EMBS), and the Society for Neuroscience (SFN).

separator
Charles Ahn
separator
Robert Armiger

Robert Armiger received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Blacksburg, VA) in 2003 and an M.S. in biomedical engineering from The Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD) in 2006. He is Assistant Group Supervisor of the Biological Sciences and Engineering Group in APL’s Research and Exploratory Development Department. His research spans the fields of biomechanics, computer-assisted surgery, robotics, and neutrally integrated prosthetics.

separator
Dr. James Beaty

James Beaty received a B.S. in biomedical engineering from The Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD), an M.S. in biomedical engineering from the University of Connecticut (Storrs, CT), an M.S. in electrical engineering and a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Yale University (New Haven, CT), and an M.B.A. from the Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, PA). Currently, Dr. Beaty serves as a project manager in APL’s Research and Exploratory Development Department, where he oversees neuroscience research for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s (DARPA’s) Revolutionizing Prosthetics program. His research focuses on brain–computer and brain–machine interfaces, neuroprosthetics, and other neural technologies that can help to solve critical challenges in the Department of Defense.

separator
Dr. Duane Cornish

Duane Cornish received a B.S. in computer engineering (2007) and a Ph.D. in computer science and engineering (2012) from The Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Cornish’s graduate research focused on surgical guidance software with work in image processing, computer vision, medical device modeling, and device tracking. Currently, he works in APL’s Asymmetric Operations Department on various projects combining cloud computing, neuroscience, image processing, computer vision, and visualization to make contributions to critical challenges for the defense and intelligence communities.

separator
Charles Davis
separator
Nathan Drenkow

Nathan Drenkow received a B.S. in electrical and computer engineering from Cornell University and an M.S. in electrical engineering from The Johns Hopkins University. He is currently a member of the Information Sciences Group in APL’s Research and Exploratory Development Department. His primary research interest is computer vision and image processing. He currently supports a diverse set of projects involving machine learning, neuromimetic computing, computer vision, and brain–computer interfaces.

separator
Dr. Alex Firpi

Alexer Firpi received a B.S. in electrical engineering from Polytechnic University (San Juan, Puerto Rico), an M.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Puerto Rico (Mayaguez, Puerto Rico), and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI). After concluding his doctoral studies, Dr. Firpi did postdoctoral work at different institutions in diverse research areas such as intelligent control, biomedical engineering, imaging genetics, and bioinformatics. He is currently a senior staff member in APL’s Research and Exploratory Development Department. Dr. Firpi’s research focuses on machine learning, brain–computer interfaces, computational intelligence, and any other research problem that can be automated by using machine-learning approaches. He is the author of more than 20 peer-reviewed publications and two book chapters.

separator
Kim Glasgow
separator
William Gray Roncal

William Gray Roncal graduated from Vanderbilt University in 2003 with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering, and he received his M.S. in electrical engineering in 2005 from the University of Southern California. Currently, Will is a Ph.D. student in electrical engineering at The Johns Hopkins University, where he is conducting research in computer vision, machine learning, and graph analysis. He applies these techniques to a variety of domains, principally related to neuroscience and estimating wiring diagrams of the brain. Will is also a member of the technical staff at APL, where he manages projects in both the Research and Exploratory Development and the Sea Control mission areas. He is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Eta Kappa Nu, and Tau Beta Pi.

separator
Dr. Michael Gross

Michael Gross received a B.S. from Rice University as well as both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Georgia Institute of Technology; each degree was in electrical engineering. His dissertation concerned high-rate, short-pulse sources for optical time-division multiplexing. His postdoctoral fellowship at the Naval Research Laboratory focused on fiber lasers for optical metrology. Dr. Gross currently serves as a senior scientist and project manager at APL, where he researches wave-matter interactions and conducts test-and-evaluation studies for the U.S. government. He has authored or coauthored more than two dozen journal articles and conference presentations, and he has won numerous awards at every stage of his career.

separator
Dr. Amy Haufler

Amy Haufler received a B.S. in health and physical education from Lock Haven University (Lock Haven, PA), an M.S. in motor learning and control (Kinesiology) from The Pennsylvania State University (University Park, PA), and a Ph.D. in exercise and performance psychology (kinesiology) from the University of Maryland (College Park, MD). Postdoctoral training was completed in occupational health psychology at the Uniformed Services University (Bethesda, MD). Currently, Dr. Haufler serves as a project manager in the Applied Neuroscience Section of APL’s Research and Exploratory Development Department. She also holds an affiliate appointment at the University of Maryland’s Center for Advanced Study of Language (CASL). Dr. Haufler’s research focuses on the neural basis of human performance to address critical challenges faced by the Department of Defense and the intelligence community. An integrative perspective is taken in which the mind (cognitive, behavioral, psychological, social/teamwork) and body (central nervous system, autonomic nervous system, genetics, neuroendocrine, musculoskeletal) are examined to understand performance outcome and engineering/work design. Subject-matter expertise includes neuropsychological aspects of optimization of human performance, stress resiliency, emotional/arousal regulation, self-regulation, and motor behavior (skill acquisition, control, and retention). Dr. Haufler is the author of more than 120 significant communications to include peer-reviewed papers, book chapters, technical reports, and national and international talks at scholarly societies. Her work regarding neural correlates of expert and novice marksmanship performance was featured in the public television video series By the Numbers.

separator
Dean Kleissas

Dean Kleissas received a B.S. in mechanical engineering and a B.S. in electrical and computer engineering from the University of Rochester in 2007. He also received an M.S. in mechanical engineering with a focus in robotics and control from The Johns Hopkins University in 2012. He is a member of the Information Sciences Group in APL’s Research and Exploratory Development Department, and his research interests span machine vision and learning, robotics and autonomy, and connectomics.

separator
Dr. Jonathon Kopecky

Jonathon Kopecky received a dual B.A. in computer science and psychology from Wesleyan University (Middletown, CT), an M.A. in statistics from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI), and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI). Currently, Dr. Kopecky serves as a senior research associate in APL’s Research and Exploratory Development Department. His research focuses on learning via multimedia to reduce cognitive biases, neuroimaging of cross-cultural adaptability, and machine learning applied to social media.

separator
Zachary Koterba

Zachary Koterba received a B.S. in biology, with double minors in chemistry and computer science, from the University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill) and is currently pursuing an M.S. in computer science/bioinformatics from The Johns Hopkins University. He is currently a member of the Information Sciences Group in APL’s Research and Exploratory Development Department. His primary research interest is web/mobile development technology and neurological data processing. He currently supports a diverse set of projects involving large-scale MRI/connectome data pipeline processing, medical practice management and specialist equipment integration, machine learning, and social mobile apps.

separator
Mary Luongo

Mary Luongo received a B.S. in biomedical engineering from The Catholic University of America (Washington, DC) in 2013. She is currently a member of the Biological Sciences and Engineering Group in APL’s Research and Exploratory Development Department. Her current focus is on human subjects research of human behavior, research study development, study implementation, and data collection.

separator
Bart Paulhamus

Bart Paulhamus received M.S. and B.S. degrees in computer science and engineering from Penn State University (State College, PA). Currently, Mr. Paulhamus serves as group supervisor of the Research and Exploratory Development Department’s Information Sciences Group. In addition, he is an adjunct faculty member and academic advisor in the Systems Engineering Program at The Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering. Mr. Paulhamus’ research focuses on combining neuromimetic computing and brain–computer interfaces with Big Data technologies to solve critical challenges in the Department of Defense and the intelligence community.

separator
Pam Pittmon
separator
Dr. Eric Pohlmeyer

Eric Pohlmeyer received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Cincinnati in 2001 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in biomedical engineering from Northwestern University in 2004 and 2008, respectively. Currently, Dr. Pohlmeyer is a Senior Professional Staff researcher in the Applied Neuroscience Section of APL’s Research and Exploratory Development Department. Dr. Pohlmeyer performs research in neural decoding, motor function, and brain–machine interfaces (BMIs) and brain–computer interfaces. He has developed methods for decoding muscle activations from the brain and created BMIs both for controlling functional electrical stimulation to restore function in paralyzed muscles and for controlling robotic systems using reinforcement learning algorithms. He has also worked with electroencephalography (EEG)-based neural interfaces, in particular with cortically coupled computer vision (C3Vision) systems that incorporate EEG recordings with computer vision systems in order to help individuals sort through large-scale image databases to find specific images.

separator
Dr. Pedro Rodriguez

Pedro Rodriguez received a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus, an M.S. in biomedical engineering from The Johns Hopkins University, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Dr. Rodriguez has been working at APL for the past nine years and currently serves as a section supervisor in the Research and Exploratory Development Department’s Analytic Capabilities Group. He has experience in developing image-detection, tracking, classification, and fusion algorithms for various sensors and modalities. His recent work has focused on developing neuromimetic algorithms for image recognition and implementing them into a Map Reduce framework. Dr. Rodriguez has been principal investigator and team leader of various projects, including Independent Research and Development projects. He is the author of several peer-reviewed publications and also serves as a reviewer for papers submitted to various journals and conferences.

separator
Dr. Matthew Roos

Matthew Roos received a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Missouri-Rolla, an M.S. in electrical and computer engineering from Purdue University, an M.S. in biomedical engineering from Duke University, and a Ph.D. in neuroscience from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Currently, Dr. Roos works in the Applied Neuroscience Section of APL’s Research and Exploratory Development Department, where he is developing neuromimetic algorithms for advanced automated sound processing. He is also researching brain–computer interfaces and the applicability of modern machine-learning techniques to associated physiological signals. As a doctoral student at The Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Roos used in vivo animal models combined with linear and nonlinear neuronal network models to study the role of inhibitory neurotransmitters in shaping auditory perception. He previously worked with the defense and intelligence communities developing signal processing algorithms for communication and speech systems.

separator
Ashok Sivakumar
separator
Jason Spitaletta

Jason Spitaletta is a major in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve currently assigned to the Joint Staff J7 Deputy Director for Joint and Coalition Warfighting as an observer/trainer. Before that, he was assigned to 4th Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company (ANGLICO), where he deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. In civilian life, he is a researcher at APL. He received a bachelors’ degree in biochemistry from Franklin & Marshall College, obtained master’s degrees in human factors and applied experimental psychology from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and Catholic University, respectively, and is currently a doctoral candidate at Catholic University. He also holds a graduate certificate from Stanford University’s Summer Institute in Political Psychology.

separator
Dr. Francesco Tenore

Francesco Tenore received a laurea in electronics engineering from the University of Trieste (Trieste, Italy) and M.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from The Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD). Currently, Dr. Tenore serves as a project manager in APL’s Research and Exploratory Development Department, where he oversees the neuroscience, regulatory, and implantable-device efforts for the Revolutionizing Prosthetics program. His research focuses on brain–computer and brain–machine interfaces, neuroprosthetics, and other neural technologies that can help to solve critical challenges in the Department of Defense. He is the author of more than 30 peer-reviewed publications, and his work has been featured in media outlets including Nature news and NPR.

separator
Tammy Tober

Tammy Tober received an M.S. in environmental science and policy from The Johns Hopkins University and two B.S. degrees from the University of Maryland at College Park—one in geography (environmental science) and one in decision information science and finance. Currently, she serves as program management administrator supporting APL’s Applied Neuroscience Portfolio. Her background experience and focus are in project management, communications, and data management and analysis.

separator
Dr. Michael Wolmetz

Michael Wolmetz received a B.Sc. in computer science from Yale University and a Ph.D. in cognitive science from The Johns Hopkins University. He also completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the Laboratory of Computational Audio Perception in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at The Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering. Dr. Wolmetz is currently a Senior Professional Staff member in APL’s Research and Exploratory Development Department, where he works on a variety of programs in the Applied Neuroscience portfolio. His research focuses on applications related to audition, language, learning, and attention.

separator