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NASA's Voyager mission

Voyagers in the Heliosheath

This artist's concept shows NASA's two Voyager spacecraft exploring a turbulent region of space known as the heliosheath, the outer shell of the bubble of charged particles around our sun. After more than 35 years of travel, the two Voyager spacecraft will soon reach interstellar space, which is the space between stars.

Our sun gives off a stream of charged particles that form a bubble around our solar system, known as the heliosphere. The solar wind travels at supersonic speeds until it crosses a shockwave called the termination shock. That part of our solar system is shown in bright blue. Voyager 1 crossed the termination shock in December 2004, and Voyager 2 did so in August 2007. Beyond the termination shock is the heliosheath, shown in gray, where the solar wind dramatically slows down and turns to flow toward the tail of the heliosphere. Outside the heliosphere is territory dominated by the interstellar wind, which is blowing from the left in this image. As the interstellar wind approaches the heliosphere, the interstellar ions are deflected around the outside as indicated by the bright arc.

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Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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