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February 27, 2008

Media Contacts:

Jennifer Huergo
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
240-228-5618 or 443-778-5618

APL Engineer Receives the 2008 Black Engineer of the Year Award for Outstanding Technical Contribution in Government

Nancy Linton, a systems engineer at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., has been awarded the 2008 Black Engineer of the Year Award for Outstanding Technical Contribution in Government. The award was presented at the 22nd Black Engineer of the Year Awards Conference in Baltimore, on Feb. 16, 2008.

Linton joined APL in 2005, and develops, tests and evaluates electronic countermeasure systems in support of the U.S. military. Her analysis of one such system not only reduced testing costs and minimized the need for additional testing, but also identified several ways to better protect deployed forces.

Linton earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland, and master's degrees in electrical and computer engineering and in systems engineering, both from The Johns Hopkins University. She is a member of the Society of Women Engineers, IEEE and the Association of Old Crows, a professional society for the field of electronic warfare, information operations and related disciplines.

"Throughout my career, I have always had mentors that taught, guided and challenged me to go farther than I thought I could go," says Linton. "There are so many people at APL just like me who are so diligent because they love what they do and are given the freedom by management to use their creativity and technical skills. Being recognized for this work is truly a great honor."

The Black Engineer of the Year Awards are sponsored by Career Communications Group, Inc., the Council of Engineering Deans of the Historically Black College and Universities, Lockheed Martin Corporation and USBE and Information Technology magazine.

APL's Kwame Osei-Wusu (Modern Day Technology Leader) and Gwen Boyd (Most Important Blacks in Technology Award) were also recognized at the ceremony.

Photo available upon request.


The Applied Physics Laboratory, a division of The Johns Hopkins University, meets critical national challenges through the innovative application of science and technology. For more information, visit www.jhuapl.edu.